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Julián Costas-Fernández
Eleonora Patacchini
Jorgen Harris
Marco Battaglini
Ricardo Fernholz
Alberto Bisin
Jess Benhabib
Cian Ruane
Pete Klenow
Mark Bils
Peter Hull
Will Dobbie
David Arnold
Eric Zwick
Owen Zidar
Matt Smith
Ansgar Walther
Tarun Ramadorai
Paul Goldsmith-Pinkham
Andreas Fuster
Ellora Derenoncourt
Golvine de Rochambeau
Vinayak Iyer
Jonas Hjort
Elena Simintzi
Paige Ouimet
Holger Mueller
Pablo Garriga
Gabriel Ulyssea
Costas Meghir
Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg
Rafael Dix-Carneiro
Alessandro Toppeta
Áureo de Paula
Orazio Attanasio
Seth Zimmerman
Joseph Price
Valerie Michelman
Camille Semelet
Anne Brockmeyer
Pierre Bachas
Santiago Pérez
Elisa Jácome
Leah Boustan
Ran Abramitzky
Jesse Rothstein
Jeffrey T. Denning
Sandra Black
Wei Cui
Mathieu Leduc
Philippe Jehiel
Shivam Gujral
Suraj Sridhar
Attila Lindner
Arindrajit Dube
Pascual Restrepo
Łukasz Rachel
Benjamin Moll
Kirill Borusyak
Michael McMahon
Frederic Malherbe
Gabor Pinter
Angus Foulis
Saleem Bahaj
Stone Centre
Phil Thornton
James Baggaley
Xavier Jaravel
Richard Blundell
Parama Chaudhury
Dani Rodrik
Alan Olivi
Vincent Sterk
Davide Melcangi
Enrico Miglino
Fabian Kosse
Daniel Wilhelm
Azeem M. Shaikh
Joseph Romano
Magne Mogstad
Suresh Naidu
Ilyana Kuziemko
Daniel Herbst
Henry Farber
Lisa Windsteiger
Ruben Durante
Mathias Dolls
Cevat Giray Aksoy
Angel Sánchez
Penélope Hernández
Antonio Cabrales
Wendy Carlin
Suphanit Piyapromdee
Garud Iyengar
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Meet the Stone Centre PhD Scholars

Joern Onken

Joern is a PhD student at the UCL Department of Economics.

Tell us a bit about your PhD research and the area(s) of economics you are interested in?

My research studies how household heterogeneity affects wealth inequality and the business cycle. While the so-called “heterogenous agent” macroeconomics literature has made many advances in this area, household heterogeneity in these models typically stems from different exposure to uninsurable income risk over time. In reality however, much of the economic inequalities between households are driven by demographic factors (gender, marital status, age, number of children). The aim of my research is to explore whether accounting for richer heterogeneity along these dimensions can improve our understanding of wealth inequality and of macroeconomic fluctuations. In my current project, I study the implications of the growing share of single households for the macroeconomy.


Why did you apply for the Stone Centre scholarship, what do you hope to achieve and how will your work contribute to the Centre's mission?

The Stone Centre’s mission aligns very well with my research interest. The Stone Centre brings together leading academics from different fields of economics to address this question, which creates a fruitful environment for research that I am thrilled to be a part of. My goal as a Stone Centre PhD Scholar is to explore how accounting for richer household heterogeneity, specifically in terms of demographic factors – changes our understanding of wealth concentration, the business cycle, and of optimal economic policies. I will approach this goal by setting up a model of the macroeconomy with heterogeneous households, solved using state-of-the-art numerical techniques. In doing so, I hope that my research can help to shed light on (in my opinion understudied) demographic inequalities and how they shape economic disparities.


What educational material are you interested in developing with support from the Centre?

Standard undergraduate macroeconomics modules still mostly refer to “representative household” models. However, a quickly growing part of the macroeconomic literature (“family macro”) shows that much of households’ responses to economic shocks (and thus macroeconomic outcomes) depends on household structure. I aim to develop teaching resources that bring undergraduate courses closer to the findings of this research. One example would be to show how secular changes such as increased female labour supply can explain key macroeconomic trends, by going from the micro (household) level to the macro (economy) level. Moreover, the educational material could illustrate the links between family macroeconomics and inequality, a topic not just on the agenda of the Stone Centre but also on the mind of economics students, as in-class surveys have shown. I hope that these teaching materials make the link between households’ decision-making and the aggregate economy more tangible to the students.

Thomas Lazarowicz

Thomas is a PhD student at the UCL Department of Economics.

Tell us a bit about your PhD research and the area(s) of economics you are interested in

I am particularly interested in Macroeconomics and Firm Dynamics. My current work examines within country regional disparities in economic performance, with a particular application to the “levelling up” policy agenda in the United Kingdom. My research focusses on understanding how the firm life cycle varies across space and time, and the consequences for policy and policymakers if we want to close the gaps in economic outcomes between regions.

Why did you apply for the Stone Centre scholarship, what do you hope to achieve and how will your work contribute to the Centre's mission?

I was keen to join the wider Stone Centre community. There are so many excellent researchers working as part of the Stone Centre - one of the leading hubs for economics research on inequality - across the world, and having the opportunity to learn from them was too good an opportunity to pass up.

What educational material are you interested in developing with support from the Centre?

I would like to build an insights piece for the CORE Econ website looking at the importance of firms for economic outcomes. Often in macroeconomics, we take the firm side of the economy as given and focus on the household. I’d like to show people that firms are interesting too!

Authors

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Stone Centre at UCL.

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